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20130228
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
over one day. another factor is there are rebels jihaddists, al-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't rul
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
, likely methods of attack on the u.s. homela. ge body of intelligence we got by capturing khalid sheikh mohammed and putting him through enhanced inter know,rogati thers been some f.b.i. officials that said we have this information, some of the information that he divulged we had from other sources. >> well, he was telling us the truth. >> rose: but if you had the information beforehand, was it necessary? >> so we should have killed khalid sheikh mohammed? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i'm a big believer in the interrogation program. the point is -- >> rose: b i mean go ahead. >> k.s.m. was more than anybody else objected to enhanced interrogation techniques and more than anybody else provided us with key pieces of intelligence that we needed in order to defend the nation against al qaeda. >> rose: define "enhanced interrogation." >> it was a specific set of techniques that were used, applied to detainees. every one of those techniques were used on our own people in training. through our seal program, the asian program. >> rose: including waterboarding? >> including waterboarding. a t ofamer
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)